Lawyers representing North Carolina individuals who have Premises Liability legal issue in Charlotte.

Sexual Harassment

Workplace Sexual Harassment and What You Should Know Sexual Harassment Sexual harassment is a hot topic in today’s headlines.  Hollywood’s elite, politicians, athletes, journalists, musicians, and sports figures alike are under fire amid allegations of inappropriate behavior and unwanted sexual conduct.  These are public figures so their salacious behavior makes the news. Sexual harassment doesn’t…

Medical Records

Medical Records and Your Rights Following a car accident or some other personal injury action an individual will eventually find themselves being treated for their injuries.  In order to substantiate your injuries and pursue your case, your lawyer needs to obtain a copy of your medical records. The process is relatively simple—we will send a…

Social Media and Personal Injury Claims

Social Media There is a plethora of information, among other things, on the world wide web, including the popular and ever growing phenomenon of social media, such as, to name a few, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Snapchat, Instagram, Pinterest, and Google. According to a 2014 survey by Pew Research Center, 74% of adults frequently use social…

Personal Injury, Health Insurance Subrogation and The Attorney’s Responsibility

Memorandum In Re: ERISA and Subrogation in North Carolina North Carolina personal injury law is complex. Not only do plaintiffs have to deal with the laws of negligence (premises liability, motor vehicle, medical malpractice) you have to deal with HIPPA, Medicare, Medicaid, as well as the state and federal laws dealing with health insurance Subrogation,…

Intoxication and Contributory Negligence

Our personal injury lawyers have handled numerous cases, which have been denied by the insurance company, when the plaintiff was intoxicated. Many insurance adjusters assert, incorrectly, that intoxication, standing alone, is evidence of contributory negligence. However, intoxication alone is not grounds for a jury instruction of contributory negligence if it is not a proximate cause…